Police investigating package sent to Perez's home

Police investigating package sent to Perez's home

Police investigating package sent to Perez's home

NEW YORK -- An investigation remains open after a search warrant was executed at the residence of Indians pitcher Chris Perez on Tuesday, but the closer's culpability in the case is unclear at this point.

The Rocky River police held a press conference Wednesday to discuss the situation involving Perez, who is in his first year at the residence in question. According to Rocky River police chief Kelly Stillman, there have been previous problems at the same address for "quite a volley of incidents," but those matters involved prior tenants.

"There were a lot of things that happened at that home," said Stillman, referring to the time period before Perez lived at the address, located in a suburb on Cleveland's West Side. "We've been to that home on numerous occasions."

The police indicated that an unspecified illegal substance was delivered to Perez's home via the United States Postal Service.

"After the delivery was made," Stillman said, "a search warrant was executed, evidence was obtained and brought back and will be turned over to our [bureau of criminal investigation] unit and city prosecutor for charges once we get back all the results from the product."

Stillman noted that "a multijurisdictional operation" was conducted by the West Shore Enforcement Bureau and Narcotics Unit, U.S. Postal Investigative Services and the Rocky River P.D. The Rocky River police chief reiterated that there have been no criminal arrests made.

"It's no mystery that this was obviously a controlled substance," Stillman said, "and depending on what it was and how much it was, charges will be filed accordingly."

Prior to Cleveland's game against the Yankees on Wednesday afternoon, Indians manager Terry Francona addressed the matter.

"I can't say anything. I've talked to C.P.," Francona. "We are still looking into getting more information. Other than that, being respectful to the situation, there's nothing to say. That's kind of what it is."

Considering that the matter remains open, the Indians organization took the same stance regarding the situation. Cleveland general manager Chris Antonetti released a statement on Wednesday afternoon, echoing Francona's remarks.

"Earlier this morning we were made aware of a situation involving RHP Chris Perez that occurred yesterday in Rocky River," Antonetti said. "We have talked with Chris and are currently in the process of gathering additional information. We will not have any additional comment at this time."

MLB.com reached out to both Perez and the pitcher's attorney, Derron Enenstein, but neither party immediately returned a request for comment.

Perez is currently on the disabled list with a strained right shoulder, suffered May 26 while pitching in Boston. Perez was scheduled to resume throwing on Wednesday, and is eligible to return to action on Tuesday. Francona was not immediately sure if the ongoing legal matter would affect Perez's rehab schedule.

"I honestly don't know," Francona said. "Let's not only go one day at a time. Let's go an hour at a time here."

Perez, 27, has converted six of his eight save chances this season while compiling a 4.32 ERA in 17 appearances. He surrendered seven runs in 2 2/3 innings in his final three outings before landing on the DL with the shoulder issue, which was first a problem in Spring Training.

Francona said he learned of the situation late Tuesday night.

"That was the end of my night's sleep," Francona said. "I called him [Wednesday morning]. I just wanted to make sure he was OK. Other than that, we can't, I can't [comment]. We just have to allow the process to unfold."

Zack Meisel and Jordan Bastian are reporters for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.